Scientists have created a plaster that can recognize harmful bacteria like Salmonella and Escherichia coli in food. This adhesive can also determine if the... Doctors created a plaster against food poisoning

Scientists have created a plaster that can recognize harmful bacteria like Salmonella and Escherichia coli in food. This adhesive can also determine if the wounds were infected without removing the bandages.

Scientists managed to develop a patch that recognizes harmful bacteria like Escherichia coli and Salmonella in food. The patch contains sensors that detect harmful pathogens when placed on a food package.

The device sends signals to users’ smartphones, advising not to use these products. Researchers hope that this patch will eventually replace the usual labels on the shelf life of products that are not always reliable.

Every year almost 10% of the inhabitants of our planet face food poisoning, and more than 50% suffer from diarrhea. Food poisoning is usually caused by raw or poorly cooked meat, eggs and dairy products infected with E. coli, norovirus, salmonella or campylobacter.

“If you go to the grocery store, you will want to be confident in the freshness of the meat you buy and the safety of this product for you and your entire family,” say the authors of the study from the University of McMaster in Canada. “And if the package contains our plaster, this will be a much more effective way of informing than the usual storage time stamping, and we believe that this patch can be put on bandages to determine if the wounds have not been infected. Finally, he has the potential to determine the sterility of surgical instruments. “

Clinical studies have shown that this patch determines even low concentrations of Escherichia coli in meat and orange juice. The device remains stable for at least the entire shelf life of many packaged foods.

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